Treaties and agreements are by far the most widespread legal means and, to some extent, determine most of our social relationships. However, legally enforceable agreements can be characterized as contracts, while agreements that are not applicable by law are considered non-applicable. These agreements are generally immoral elements or the public policies of the state. Section 2 (g) of the Indian Contract Act, 1872 defines undedified agreements. In addition, sections 24 to 30 and 56 of the Act define the specific types of agreements/contracts that do not agree. Since an agreement in vain makes no sense in the eyes of the law, it does not change the position or relationship of the treaties. None of the parties should have any interest other than the bet to win or lose. This is what distinguishes the insurance contract from a betting contract. Another common reason for a non-contract is the impossibility of delivery. This occurs when an aspect of the contract can no longer be executed by one of the parties. c) The promise was to do something in person, and the promisor dies or is handicapped by illness or misadventure. Such cases are generally seen in practice in practice. The contract must be fulfilled only by the seller and not by his representative or by a third party, as the performance of the contract is based on personal abilities or qualities.

In such cases, the contract is cancelled if the patient or disability or even death. 4. Decide whether a new contract can be developed or whether the contract should be completely abandoned. Every person has a legitimate right to do or accept a legitimate profession, business or commercial activity. If an agreement is reached to retain this right, it is a violation of its fundamental right and is also contrary to public policy. That is why the Indian Contracts Act expressly struck down these agreements. An important point in this regard is to remember it. If one party is aware of the impossibility of benefit and enters into an agreement with the other party, the other party will be entitled to compensation for the loss or injury it has suffered. Such an agreement boils down to fraud, as discussed on page 17 of the act. For example, A knew that the wood for which he made a sale agreement to B had already been destroyed by fire, so his agreement with B was not covered by this section, but by the S.17 of the law. Another good example is example (c) of S.56, where A prohibits marriage contracts with B, already married to C and subject to polygamy by the law of which he is subject. A must be compensated B for the loss it suffered as a result of non-fulfilling the promise.

However, the contract is considered invalid, if B has several offices, it creates confusion in B`s mind with regard to the place of delivery.