(e) pharmacists and prescribers` bodies which conclude agreements on the common pharmaceutical practice shall keep a copy of the written agreement on the common practice of pharmacy in their places of practice. That our WADA develop model national legislation to address the expansion of the pharmacist sector, which is inappropriate or constitutes the practice of medicine, including, but not limited to, the issue of the interpretation or use of independent practice agreements without adequate medical supervision and cooperation with interested States and disciplines to advance such legislation (Action Directive). [64] For pharmacists, I believe you have arrived at one of the few hubs that will determine the future of your profession. Either you will take your place as a care provider or your number will decrease as most distribution activities will be replaced by robotics and pharmacy technicians. I am a physician, and I say that our profession and the patients we serve need you ”in the team” as clinical pharmacists. But will you really join us? [56] CPAs are a priority of advocacy efforts for professional pharmacy organizations. In January 2012, the American Pharmacists Association (APhA) brought together a consortium of pharmacy, medicine and care stakeholders from 12 countries to discuss the integration of CSAs into daily clinical life. [53] The consortium published a white paper entitled ”Consortium Recommendations for Advancing Pharmacists` Patient Care Services and Collaborative Practice Agreements,” in which it summarizes its recommendations. [18] The legal guidelines and requirements for the constitution of SAAs are defined from one state to another. [7] The federal government approved the SAAs in 1995.

[2] Washington was the first state to pass laws allowing for the formal formation of ASAs. In 1979, Washington changed the practice of pharmaceutical treatments[8], which provides for the establishment of ”collaborative drug therapy” agreements. [Citation required] In February 2016, 48 states and Washington D.C passed laws to provide ASAs. [9] The only two states that do not allow the supply of ASA are Alabama and Delaware. [10] Alabama pharmacists hoped that a CPA law, House Bill 494, would be passed in 2015. [11] The bill was introduced by Alabama House representative Ron Johnson, but died in committee. [11] In 2010, the American Medical Association (AMA) published a series of reports called the AMA Scope of Practice Data Series. [61] One of the reports focused on the profession of pharmacist, which criticized the formation of SAs as an attempt by pharmacists to intervene the doctor. . . .